Dialogues Through Lyricism

HomeIn Focus

Dialogues Through Lyricism

"Beyond The Surface" at Koel Gallery captivated viewers with an edgy and enchanting exhibition of artistic lyricism, harmonizing abstract and figurat

Corpo(Realities) at The Temple of Nyx
Only Human
Ornamental Expressions


“Beyond The Surface” at Koel Gallery captivated viewers with an edgy and enchanting exhibition of artistic lyricism, harmonizing abstract and figurative works

In the ethereal realm of artistic expression, where colors and lines dance with emotion, the exhibition “Beyond The Surface” at Koel Gallery unveiled an engaging display of lyricism. A collection of works by Akram Dost Baloch, Kamran Maqsood, Roha Ahmed, Sabir Ali Talpur, and Abdul Jabbar Khan harmonized to create a palpable sense of introspection and poetic beauty.

Lyricism refers to a quality or style that conveys a sense of emotional expression, introspection, and poetic beauty. It is a subjective and often abstract concept found in various forms of artistic expression, including literature, painting, music, and dance. Lyricism transcends artistic mediums, allowing artists to infuse their works with emotional depth, evoking profound impacts on the viewers or audiences.

In visual arts, lyricism is evident in paintings or drawings that possess a dreamlike or expressive quality. Artists may use soft, flowing lines, vibrant colors, and a sense of movement to imbue their artwork with emotional depth, inviting the audience to connect on a personal and emotional level. It is a form of expression that surpasses language and logic, allowing for a more profound and intuitive understanding of the artist’s vision and message.

Beyond the Surface employed a curatorial approach focused on a tonal timbre ranging from stark black to shades of gray, lending a greater unity to the exhibition and inviting visitors to engage with the works at an uncomplicated level. The exhibition presented a variety of abstract and figurative works, with Baloch, Ahmed, and Maqsood Ahmed showcasing abstract pieces, while Talpur and Jabbar Khan delved into the figurative realm.

Baloch’s exploration of inks and paints, combined with solvents or resists, created strong swirling organic forms that appeared lithic and biomorphic. Ahmed experimented with linocut print-making, utilizing repetition and discovery to produce intricate and idiosyncratic patterns. Maqsood’s clay forms, reminiscent of Ai Wei Wei’s sunflower seeds, emanated a gentle and calm efflorescence.

Talpur’s Op Art patterns and lines constructed shapes with heightened presence, drawing inspiration from Victor Vasserely’s and Julian Stanaczak’s works. Jabbar Khan, on the other hand, used coal as a medium, resulting in impressionistic charcoal drawings with a sociopolitical objective.

The curatorial approach and limited chromaticity provided an ambiance that merged the abstract and figurative works harmoniously. The art spoke a universal language of emotions, inviting viewers on an inward journey of self-discovery and emotional connection. Beyond The Surface beckoned visitors to traverse the enchanting landscape of lyricism, where art transcends the physical and resonates deeply within the soul.

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0